Kathryn Varjian Ferrazzi - William Raveis Real Estate & Homes Services



Posted by Kathryn Varjian Ferrazzi on 11/22/2017

When it comes to selling a house, there is no reason to operate as a "basic" home seller. Instead, you can become a "responsive" home seller, i.e. someone who goes above and beyond the call of duty to get the best price for his or house.

Ultimately, becoming a responsive home seller may be easier than you think – here are three tips to ensure you can enter the real estate market as a responsive home seller.

1. Track Housing Market Patterns and Trends

As a responsive home seller, you'll want to monitor the real estate market closely. By doing so, you'll be better equipped than other property sellers to identify housing market trends and respond accordingly.

For example, if you notice a large collection of available houses and a shortage of property buyers, this likely indicates a buyer's market reigns supreme. In this market, you may face steep competition as you try to sell your house.

On the other hand, if you find that many high-quality residences are selling quickly, a seller's market may be in place. And in a seller's market, you may be better equipped than ever before to enjoy a fast, seamless home selling process.

A responsive home seller will be able to differentiate between a buyer's and seller's market. Then, this home seller can map out his or her home selling journey accordingly.

2. Remain Open to New Ideas

Selling a home often requires plenty of persistence and hard work. For responsive home sellers, it also requires flexibility and patience.

Typically, a responsive home seller will be happy to listen and respond to past home sellers' advice. This home seller will be open to learning from past home sellers' successes and failures and using their insights to make informed home selling decisions.

For those who want to become responsive home sellers, feel free to reach out to family members and friends who have sold houses in the past. This will enable you to gain deep insights into the home selling process that you might struggle to obtain elsewhere.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

With a real estate agent at his or her side, an ordinary home seller can become a responsive property seller in no time at all.

A real estate agent will communicate with a home seller throughout each stage of the home selling cycle. Meanwhile, a responsive home seller will listen to this housing market professional and work with him or her to achieve the optimal results.

Furthermore, a real estate agent will be available to respond to a home seller's concerns and queries. At the same time, a responsive home seller will be ready to collaborate with a real estate agent via phone calls, emails and texts.

Use the aforementioned tips to become a responsive home seller – you'll be happy you did. Responsive home sellers may be more likely than other property sellers to seamlessly navigate the home selling cycle and maximize the value of their residences.




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Posted by Kathryn Varjian Ferrazzi on 11/15/2017

When you stop and think about all the preparations involved in putting your house on the market and avoiding mistakes, it can feel overwhelming! The good news is that you don't have to go it alone.

An experienced real estate agent can provide you with invaluable guidance on everything from effectively staging your home to complying with seller disclosure requirements.

One aspect of selling your house in the shortest amount of time (and for the highest price) is doing everything you can to make a great first impression on prospective buyers. You've probably heard the old expression "Presentation is everything." While that might be a slight overstatement when it comes to selling your house, it is a concept that is well worth keeping in mind. The overall impression prospective buyers take away with them after they've viewed your property will have a powerful impact on whether they decide to include it on their "short list."

Let There Be Light!

Sometimes the simplest changes can produce the biggest results. One example is lighting. If a room is inadequately lit, then you're not going to be showing it to its best advantage. Spaces that are too dimly lit can come across as dreary, shadowy, and uninviting. If you have bedrooms or other living spaces that don't have a ceiling light, for example, it might be worth the expense of having an electrician come in and correct that. Otherwise, homebuyers may find it frustrating and off-putting when they flip a wall switch, and it only turns on a ceiling fan, a floor lamp, or nothing!

Dimmer switches are often an easy and inexpensive solution for rooms that seem either too bright or too dark. Prospective buyers like the feeling that they can adjust the lighting in any room to match their immediate needs and mood.

Letting in as much natural light from the outside is another way to create a bright, cheerful ambiance in your home. Using decorative curtain ties to pull back curtains as far as possible can add a nice finishing touch while allowing as much outside light to shine in as possible.

If you happen to notice that your curtains are wrinkled, faded, tattered, heavy looking, or noticeably dated, you might want to consider replacing them with newer, more cheerful versions. The appearance and age of your curtains can have a lasting effect on the impression house hunters get from your home.

While we're on the topic of windows, keeping them impeccably clean is a goal worth prioritizing. That can be a difficult thing to keep up with if you have young children and pets who are always leaving smudges on glass and mirrors, but the cleanliness of windows is a small but important detail that will be noticed by potential buyers.

Although there are dozens of things to keep in mind when trying to make a great impression on home buyers, your real estate agent will help you identify cost-effective strategies for putting your best foot forward.





Posted by Kathryn Varjian Ferrazzi on 11/8/2017

Home Insurance is a requirement, but it’s also a welcome protection for your most prized purchase. When getting insurance, you probably want a good deal on it. Your aim might be to try and save some money. There’s much more to insurance than cost, however. You need to know that whatever policy you choose will cover what you need and provide the right amounts of protection for those items. 


There’s so many different parts to an insurance policy that indicate the coverage you can have for your home, it can be dizzying. At its most basic form, home insurance protects your home from risk. This includes fire and robbery. Keep in mind that a less expensive policy will provide less coverage for you. Different types of coverage that you should be aware of are:



  • Dwelling Coverage
  • Other Structures Coverage
  • Personal Property Coverage
  • Liability Coverage


These different pieces of a home insurance policy allow for a wide variety of damages things including: Rebuilding your home, coverage that will allow you to rebuild fences, sheds and screen houses, protection if someone is injured on your property, and the insurance of your personal property contained within the home. Some policies will even cover you to live in an alternative place should your home become uninhabitable. 


Check Your Deductibles And Policy Limits


A deductible is how much you’ll need to pay before the insurance company picks up the rest of the bill. Policies with higher deductibles are less expensive to purchase. Yet, if your home does face damage, you’ll have to come up with a lot more upfront to have your home repaired. When you’re comparing home insurance policies, you’ll need to make sure that you have the same deductible amount selected for each separate policy that you’re getting a quote on. The deductible amount that you choose should be one that you’d feel comfortable paying when and if something happens to your home.  


True Comparisons


While shopping by price is a good place to start, you need to compare much more than that. You want to be sure that when you purchase a home insurance policy that you’re actually getting your money’s worth. You need to be mindful of the type of coverage that you get and the amount of deductible that you’ll need to spend in order to get that coverage. It would be tragic for something to happen to your home, only for you to find out that it’s not covered. You pay home insurance for protections, so it’s a great idea to know exactly what you’re paying for and where the safety net is surrounding your home and belongings.





Posted by Kathryn Varjian Ferrazzi on 11/1/2017

If you’re buying or selling a home for the first time you’ll likely come across several terms and acronyms you’ve never heard before. When working with a real estate agent, he or she will likely do their best to put things in simplest terms for you to understand. But, it never hurts to do your research ahead of time so you’re prepared for the lengthy and complex process of buying or selling a home.

In this article, we’ll define some of the real estate terms you’re most likely to read or hear during your search for a new home, or when you put your current home on the market.

Common real estate definitions

  • Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) - a home loan with a in interest rate which fluctuates throughout the payback term of the loan. The fluctuation typically aligns with changes in the housing market’s average interest rates.

  • Fixed rate mortgage (FRM) - Fixed rate mortgages have an interest rate that does not change for a predetermined period of time or for the entire length of the home loan repayment period.

  • Closing costs - Miscellaneous fees associated with buying a home. These include attorney fees, applications fees, taxes (property taxes, transfer taxes), underwriting costs, and more.

  • Transfer tax - A tax charged for when a property changes ownership. These vary by state. Some states do not have a transfer tax.

  • Appreciation and depreciation - Appreciation is an increase in a property value due to things like inflation. Depreciation is a decrease in property value due to market deflation, wear and tear on the property, etc.

  • Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) - A U.S. law that makes it illegal for a creditor to discriminate on the basis of the following: national origin, race, color, religion, sex, age, marital status, or to the applicant’s status as receiving public assistance from things like food stamps and social security.  

  • Mortgage escrow - an escrow is a neutral, third party agent or company which holds documents or funds until certain terms and conditions are met and a contract is fulfilled or terminated. For mortgages, lenders will often set up an escrow to pay insurance premiums and property taxes. These are typically added to your monthly mortgage bill.

  • Homeowners association (HOA) - a group of homeowners who regulate, maintain, and manage common spaces in subdivisions and condominiums. Monthly dues are typically required to upkeep common spaces. An HOA board made up of homeowners meets to vote on rules and regulations that members of the HOA must abide by.

  • Private mortgage insurance - a type of insurance that protects a lender if a borrower defaults on their home loan.

  • Exclusive agency listing - an agreement between a homeowner and a real estate broker giving the broker exclusive rights to list the home.

  • Assumable mortgage - a home loan that enables a buyer to take over the seller’s mortgage payments and loan terms.

  • Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) - A U.S. law which promotes privacy, fairness, and accuracy in reporting your credit score to lenders. This lets you correct inaccuracies and prevent certain information from being used against you when applying for a loan.




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Posted by Kathryn Varjian Ferrazzi on 10/25/2017

As a first-time home seller, it can be difficult to determine exactly what you need to do to prep your house for the real estate market. Lucky for you, we're here to teach you what it takes to sell a house in any real estate market, at any time.

Now, let's take a look at three important questions that every first-time home seller needs to consider:

1. Am I ready to sell my house?

For many first-time home sellers, the answer to this question is a resounding "No," and perhaps it is easy to understand why.

Adding a home to the real estate market requires home sellers to conduct plenty of real estate research. By doing so, a first-time home seller can determine how his or her house stacks up against comparable residences that are currently available.

Also, it may prove to be worthwhile to complete a home appraisal. This assessment will enable you to identify your house's strengths and weaknesses and complete any property repairs immediately.

2. After I sell my house, where will I go?

It is important for a first-time home seller to think about the big picture. Thus, you'll need to consider where you'll go after you sell your residence.

If you think about where you'd like to relocate, you can start planning accordingly. In fact, you can establish a home selling timeline and find ways to make the most of the time and resources available to you.

In addition, if you need to relocate as soon as possible, this may have far-flung effects on how you market your residence.

A home seller who needs to move right away may be more likely that others to list his or her house at a below-average price. On the other hand, a home seller who can afford to be patient can wait out the real estate market if necessary.

3. What should I expect when my home hits the real estate market?

Unfortunately, the housing market offers no guarantees. This means a dedicated first-time home seller who goes above and beyond the call of duty to prepare a home may watch his or her house linger on the real estate market for months. On the other hand, a home seller who does minimal prep work may watch his or her house sell immediately.

When it comes to getting ready to add your house to the real estate market, there is no reason to leave anything to chance. With an expert real estate agent at your side, you can boost your chances of getting the best results during the home selling journey.

An expert real estate agent can answer any questions that you may have about selling your house. Plus, he or she will help you list your residence, promote it to potential property buyers and set up home showings and open houses.

Ready to add your house to the real estate market? Use the aforementioned tips, and any first-time home seller can seamlessly navigate the home selling process.




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